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Research Guides

Board Game Collection: Getting Started

A guide to information about the University of Idaho's new board game collection and the the games that are a part of it

How to use this guide:

  1. All games are listed in the Complete Games list. To view, hover your mouse over the tab.
    • Each game listing contains a description of the game (including number of players, theme and mechanics of the game), the rules of the game, and a video on how to play it
  2. You can find a link to view the game availability in the library catalog by clicking on the Complete Game List tab itself.
  3. If games fall under other categories, the games will also appear in dropdown of that category
  4. If you are new to the collection or to board games, we recommend taking a look at the Getting Started Tab.

Getting Started Gaming

The Collection

This collection was the brainchild of library employees who sought to create a collection of board games for the benefit of the University of Idaho community. Board gaming in general has experienced a rise in popularity in recent decades and they provide an activity that promotes critical thinking and provides support for mental health through stress relief and collaboration. In this collection you will find games that span the range of classic game that you might have played during your childhood to modern board games that are more strategy based.

What are these games I've never heard of?

Our collection collection contains more than just those games that you grew up with. It is very likely that those games that you don't recognize are games that are considered to be Designer GamesEuroGames, or German Games. These games tend to be strategy based and have relatively simple rules and are easy to learn in one sitting. Many of these games have the ability to appeal to those new to board games in addition to experienced players. Random elements in the games give them excellent replay value.

Books and eBooks

Want to take a look at some books about board games?

You'll want to browse the GV1312 - GV1469 section. Or you can check out the selected list below.

Journal Article Roundup: Why Play Board Games?

Alvarez, Vivian. "Engaging students in the library through tabletop gaming." Knowledge Quest. 45.4 (March-April 2017): p40.

Berland, Matthew, and Victor R. Lee. "Collaborative Strategic Board Games as a Site for Distributed Computational Thinking." International Journal of Game-Based Learning, Vol. 1, no. 2, 2011.

Blodgett, Jayne, and Peter Bremer. "Rolling The DICE In An Academic Library." American Libraries 45.11/12 (2014): 50-53.

Crews, Annalisa. "Using Games to Support the Curriculum: Getting Teachers On "Board."" Knowledge Quest 40.1 (2011): 10-13.

"Broadening Our Definition Of Gaming." Library Technology Reports 44.3 (2008): 7-11.

Robbins, M. Brandon. "Ticket To Ride." Library Journal 139.5 (2014): 91.

Robbins, Brandon. "Wil Wheaton Talks Tabletop." Library Journal 138.13 (2013): 52.

Slobuski, T., Robson, D., & Bentley, P. (2017). Arranging the Pieces: A Survey of Library Practices Related to a Tabletop Game CollectionEvidence Based Library and Information Practice12(1), 2-17. https://doi.org/10.18438/B84C96