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Research Guides

Citing Sources: Additional Styles

Citing Legal Documents

For questions regarding legal citation, contact the Law Library.

Citing in the Sciences

When citing, you may be expected to use the format and style guidelines created by a specific journal. These guidelines can often be found in the first issue of each year or on the journal website.

If you need assistance finding this information please visit the Reference Desk on the 1st floor of the Library or contact us.

Citing Images

How you cite an image will depend on the citation style you are using. Additional information can be found on our Citing Images page. Commonly, image citations should include:

  • Creator's name
  • Title of the work
  • Date of creation
  • Repository, museum, or owner (current location)
  • Source (how was it accessed)
  • City or country of origin

Citing DOIs

A Digital Object Identifier, or DOI, is a specific code assigned to individual articles. DOIs provide a permanent path to the resource.  They are commonly used by publishers and usually look something like this, doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2009.01.017

You can search a DOI by inputting the code into Cross Ref or the Digital Object Identifier System.

Due to their ability to provide direct access to articles, many citation formats require you to include the DOI in your citation.  Here is an example of a citation in APA including a DOI:

J.A. Gravelle, G. Ice, T.E. Link, D.L. Cook, Nutrient concentration dynamics in an inland Pacific Northwest watershed before and after timber harvest, Forest Ecology and Management, Volume 257 (8), 1663-1675. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2009.01.017

Citing Datasets

If you are following a particular style, try to form the citation according to the general rules of that style.  If in doubt, it is better to provide more information than less.

The main parts of a data citation are:

  • Responsible Party
  • Title of dataset
  • Edition or version of dataset, if applicable
  • Name and location of data center, repository, or publisher
  • Date published
  • Analysis software, if required
  • Date accessed
  • URL, DOI or other persistent link
  • Parameters selected, if applicable

Additional information from Dryad on Citing Data is also available.